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Chicago Urban League Youth Pens Blog on “Dear White People” Screening at Black Film Fest

“Dear Black People” Review

I’m giving a review on the movie “Dear White People.” First off let me start by saying the moving was very interesting in showing how modern day racism still exists in America.

The movie “Dear White People” is about a college campus that’s run basically like a slave owner’s plantation. To me, it’s more like America back in the 1800’s during the Jim Crow (Reconstruction Time Period).

Black people get a little bit of power and the white man (Government) gets offended and wanna shut it down. This movie reminds me of a lesson I went over in American History class and how black people start to obtain a little bit of political power after the civil war to help the growth and development of the black community.

Now I’m connecting this back to the movie “Dear White People” to when the character Samantha won the election of the house in the beginning of the movie (that’s that power I’m talking about). In the movie, they tried to frame her on fixing the votes so she could win. See? That’s what I’m talking about. In the film, they didn’t want to see the African American community prosper and would stop at nothing to try to destroy that type of advancement.  A quote that I always keep in the back of my mind, “It takes years to build a reputation, but it only takes a day to ruin it.”

The over all movie was enjoyable to watch and very entertaining. I would rate this movie a 4 out of 5 stars. Would I recommend this movie to others in my age group?  Yes…yes I would. It’s a very good example of how years can progess, but in many ways, we are still living the lives and struggles of our ancestors.

-Khaleb Johnson-Keller is a junior at Urban Prep Englewood High School and active participant in CUL’s Center for Student Development programs.